Deprecated: __autoload() is deprecated, use spl_autoload_register() instead in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php on line 17

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 22

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 23

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 25

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 26

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 27

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 28

Warning: ini_set(): Headers already sent. You cannot change the session module's ini settings at this time in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 29

Warning: session_set_save_handler(): Cannot change save handler when headers already sent in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Data/AbstractSQL.php on line 86

Warning: session_name(): Cannot change session name when headers already sent in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 45

Warning: session_start(): Cannot start session when headers already sent in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 46

Warning: session_cache_limiter(): Cannot change cache limiter when headers already sent in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Session.php on line 47

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Common/Page.php on line 57

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Common/Page.php on line 58

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Webmention.php on line 376

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/Webmention.php on line 377

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/PubSubHubbub.php on line 41

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Core/PubSubHubbub.php on line 42

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/Idno/Common/Page.php on line 998

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/bonita/includes/Bonita/Templates.php on line 170

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/templates/default/shell.tpl.php on line 5

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/external/htmlpurifier-lite/library/HTMLPurifier.autoload.php:17) in /home/rachelsa/rise18.rachelsagnerbuurma.org/templates/default/shell.tpl.php on line 6
Ploy Promrat
Skip to main content

Looking at the bibliography highlights a lot of the arguments the various authors we have read (Armstrong, Mckeon, etc) are trying to make about the novel. The epistolary form is important, it makes the private oriented towards the public, women are central characters and thus deeply subjectified, etc, and we can see all this through the list of novels from 1776-1780.
In 1778, authors are sometimes, but not often, referred to on the title page—and when they are it is usually in reference to their other work rather than their name. Sometimes, it even says “by a young lady” which echoes the feminization of the novel that we read about in Northanger Abbey. However, when a novel’s author is referred to be name or at least Mr. ___, it is usually a male author. I found this interesting because the novel seems to be pretty clearly feminized in terms of both content and reception.
I also noticed that beginning in 1778, the title pages contain summaries or a kind of description of the novel. I wonder if this is because of the increasing popularity of the genre, and so there needed to be more of a way to distinguish different types of novels. Were people developing tastes for different genres within the novel? In 1778, it’s clear that the novel is becoming more defined as a category — some of the title pages in fact contain the word “novel”.

I was pretty interested in these title pages that seemed to be trying to “sell” their work with descriptions on the title page. The 1779 edition of Evelina does not have such a title page—the word Evelina is big, making her the central focus of the novel. Compared with The History of Miss Harriot Fairfax, from 1800, which has a lengthy overview of all the major plot points, Evelina’s title page is pretty bare. This is sort of reminiscent of what we’d see on the backs of books. Perhaps with the novel really coming into its own, there was more of a need to distinguish audiences and types of stories. Neither have the author listed on the title page, or at all in the preface, though Miss Harriot Fairfax’s title page says “written by a lady” and the first few lines warn that the novel was written by a woman. I found this interesting, that there was such an emphasis on the gender of the author even though clearly at the time, authors were not central to the way novels were marketed.

Armstrong outlines a shift in political power that is a change in how and where we locate desire. This shift is made possible through the deep subjectification of the female character in novels. Thus, social change occurs with the woman as the vehicle for this change, without her being able to exercise any real political power or agency. Pamela simultaneously reflects and creates this “new woman”. We can understand this lack of agency through the relationship between clothing, writing, and the innermost self in Pamela.



Evidence:
Mr. B searching for letters
-- He is able to access her truest self through her writing, nonconsensually.
--Conflation of identity + sexuality for this new model of middle class women
Epistolary form
--Her truest self is represented to us in the way her letters are written.
--Privacy of her letters becomes public
Clothing
--Dressing across class → mobility (rise of middle class values)
--Middle class values imposed on Pamela as a character, she does not actually exercise political power

Pamela shows us how the rise of new middle class values and power goes hand in hand with the subordination and lack of agency of women.

I used chapter five of Tristram Shandy and a free trial version of Prizmo for the OCR editor. As others have noted, there were mostly errors on the level of the letter (such as confusing the letter s for f). While I am very unfamiliar with the software, perhaps having sort of an autocorrect dictionary could be useful in avoiding these mistakes, especially since they popped up so often.

I think it is very useful for these databases of digital facsimiles of these books to exist alongside actual copies of the books. The digital facsimile allows for a preservation of the original text; it allows us to understand the meaning of certain stylistic choices in context, and it allows us to get a better idea of the embodied experience of novel reading as it once was. Of course, being able to just get the text from the digital facsimile is extremely valuable, it allows for an increased ability to access the text. The two forms should not be considered as an exact replacements or conversions though, they are obviously connected but give us as the reader different ways of accessing the text.

The Google maps version of Crusoe’s journey maps on the locations from the book, whether traveled there by Crusoe or just mentioned in passing. This map highlights the number of locations mentioned—it is clear that place and space factor monumentally into the book. I appreciate the way the map shows that places are important and should be imagined in relation to one another, highlighting the importance of travel and movement as well. I found it interesting that, although the novel is part of a colonial project, most of the places are in Europe, which allows us to understand the perspective of the novel as distinctly that of the colonizer.

“Friday”, who we know as one of the main secondary characters in the novel, appears in the list of dates rather than names in the NER generated lists. Of course, this can be accounted for as an error on NER’s part, but it is telling of Friday’s role. Crusoe named him Friday rather deliberately, and it shows how marks his time on the island with events rather than actual time itself. From the text, we can read his description of Friday as being objectifying and dehumanizing. Friday being omitted from the list of people is indicative of how he is dehumanized by Crusoe but also can point to a fuller understanding of his actual name by putting it on the list of times. Interestingly, “Sunday” is the only other day of the week that is mentioned in the novel (or at least catalogued in the NER list), which is in line with Crusoe’s increasing commitment to religion throughout the novel. It is interesting that, according to the NER results, time is not as important a marker in the novel, or at least not as important as location for example, which has by far the most entries. Is there more significance behind Friday’s name because days of the week are so rarely mentioned? Perhaps it is a way for Crusoe to connect himself more with the way time is kept in mainstream society, off the island. Friday, through his character and his actual name, shows that Crusoe’s life on the island, though remote, is still indicative and reflective of society.